How To Improve Your Garden With Compost

 

Everyone loves a beautifully maintained garden decked with healthy plants. Consorting to the use of chemicals to enhance these plants defeats their entire purpose, especially if they are of the edible variety. See here is the thing about using compost – not only does it provide a nutritional boost but it also makes the soil come alive. It creates the perfect environment for beneficial bacteria and critters to thrive which in turn help the plants bloom. Using natural fertilizers and soil improvers such as compost are great ways to reap the benefits of a healthy garden without damaging the soil or the plants in the long run, according to an article written on www.planetnatural.com.

Composting is an old technique of adding table scraps, kitchen waste, manure, yard clippings and any other organic wastes from around the house to a pile. While the pile was usually left in the open to decompose in the past, sealed compost bins have made the process faster and less smelly. In the olden days, adding lime or other sweet smelling herbs to the heap kept it from smelling too much. However, during the rainy season, the stench was inevitable – hence the birth of sealed compost bins that could be moved around the garden and closed to keep it from attracting pests and protecting it from the environment. Additionally, the hermetical seal meant that anaerobic bacteria could flourish, leading to a quicker breakdown of the materials in the bin.

Creating a compost heap in your backyard is a cheap way to make your very own mulch and fertilizer. Not only does this come at no extra cost to you, but you can vary the ingredients you add to get a complex, tailored mixture to suit your exact needs. Think your soil is lacking potassium? Add in a couple of banana peels. For calcium, add a few more eggshells than usual – the possibilities and permutations are endless. Compost heaps provide not only fertilizer and mulch but also a runoff called compost leach which can be used as a liquid fertilizer around plants. A stronger liquid fertilizer called compost tea can be made by keeping the compost in water over a period of time and using the nutrient-rich liquid.

Of course, there are some drawbacks to creating and maintaining a compost heap. For many people, the most off-putting feature of composting is the time it takes for the organic waste to break down into an almost soil-like consistency. In fair weather, this can take about 6 weeks. Composting is a seasonal activity if you live in areas with snowfall. While you can technically still add to the compost heap, the lower temperatures slow the decomposing process which means you may have to wait an entire season before the process is complete.

Whether you are new to composting or a dedicated follower of the principle, having a compost heap guarantees an endless supply of fertilizer and mulch for your garden. There are a ton of resources available on the subject from audio books to monthly magazines and dedicated chat forums. Depending on where and what technique you learn, the results are bound to vary, but the benefits remain the same.